Reduce Electrical Bills – Improve your Budget

Reduce Electrical Bills with these simple tips

I have been trying to find ways to reduce electric bills. It is one of the largest expenses every month for our family. Following are some tips I have found.

Washing – Do not run washing machines (dish or clothes) until you have a full load.

Drying – Clean the lint trap on your clothing dryer. Not only will this help reduce electrical bills, it can help your dryer last longer. Modern dryers measure the temperature of the air to adjust how hot the heating element needs to be. If your lint trap is plugged, it can cause the temperature readings to be incorrect. This can cause excessive electrical use.

I also found out the hard way, lint buildup can cause your heating element to run hotter than it should. At best, this can cause the heating element to overheat and need early replacement. At worst, it could cause a dangerous lint fire. Thankfully in our case, I just had to replace the heating element, which was partially melted.

Line Dry – Hang your clothes outside. Reduce electrical bills while getting fresh air! If you are embarrassed about your underwear hanging outside, buy a laundry pole that will hold three to four lines. Hang sheets and towels on the outer lines. Hang your unmentionables on the inner lines, so that the sheets will hide most of them.

If your clothes are stiff when line dried, it is likely that not all of the detergent has been washed out of the cloth. There are many recipes for making your own laundry at home (another money saving tip). Most of the home made laundry detergents will not leave your clothes feeling rough and stiff when dried on a line.

Hot Water – Put an insulation blanket on your water heater. Better yet, get an instant hot water unit or a solar pre-heater. Turn down the temperature on the water heater a few degrees is another suggestion to reduce electrical bills.

Climate – Adjust your thermostat, and run a ceiling fan in conjunction with your HVAC unit. This can help reduce electrical bills year-round. During the summer, our temperature inside is around 78*, and during the winter, it’s about 65*. We wear shorts and lightweight shirts during the summer, and socks, flannel pants, and warm shirts or sweaters during the winter.

Heating – Maintaining creature comforts can be tough in the winter. Use a room / space heater to reduce electrical bills. This will heat only the room you are using. This allows you to leave the rest of the house at a cooler temperature. I do this in my DJ practice area, and in our bedrooms at night. Of course, if you have an open concept house, or on the weekends when everyone is home and in different rooms, this may not work as well.

Upgrade – Replace your old mercury switch thermostat with a new smart or programmable unit. I’ve never used one, but the Nest is very popular. I replaced our old thermostat with a programmable unit. The thermostat was around $100, IIRC. We had a heat pump system, so the thermostat was more expensive. However, being able to program the temperatures to our schedule, I was able to reduce electrical bills, which paid for the thermostat very quickly. Since I did the work myself, there was no installation cost.

Lighting – Simply replacing lightbulbs can reduce electrical bills. New LED bulbs are expensive, but you can sometimes find good deals on multi-packs. Replace halogen floor torch lamps and incandescent bulbs. Don’t buy the CFL “curly Q” bulbs, as they are filled with mercury, a toxic heavy metal.

Reduce electrical bills without using candles

Reduce electrical bills?

I buy lights made by CREE, rather than GE for a couple of reasons. Not due to their lighting specifically, but because of GE’s business practices, and tax dodges.

Instead of leaving the light in the hallway on, or the vent-a-hood light over the stove on, use LED nightlights. These use pennies of electricity each year, which will reduce electrical bills while still providing area light for safety.

Use fluorescent light tubes in your shop, garage, or basement. They produce little heat, use very little electricity, and provide a nice even lighting for safety in the shop.

Charging – Charge your cell phone and laptop at work or in the car, rather than leaving them plugged in at home all the time.

Vampires – Get power strips, so you can flip one switch to kill all the power to several devices at one time. This will reduce electrical bills by preventing “vampire” loss. Modern electronic devices, such as TV’s, DVD players, computers, and microwaves all stay in a constant “low power” standby mode. The devices must have power to operate the receiver for the remote control, as well as the clock and calendar (used by your game console, for example). This causes the device to draw power, even when “turned off”. All this power being used by all these devices will add up each month.

Security – You can reduce electrical bills while still providing safety and ambiance outside your home. Consider installing outdoor lights on timers, light sensors, or motion sensors. Buy solar lights for walkways.

Windows – If you don’t have insulated windows, and cannot replace them, you can still prevent drafts and air leaks. We are currently renting. The house is old, with aluminum framed windows. It doesn’t make sense for the landlord to replace the windows, since they are functional, and the landlord doesn’t pay the light bill. I went to Lowe’s and bought a few packages of the plastic sheeting that goes over the windows inside the house. For less than $50, I was able to reduce electrical bills. I left the plastic up over the past year. We had less pollen and dust inside in the spring, and the interior stayed cooler in the summer. Winter will be here soon… The cost of the plastic will be divided by two years of service.

Doors – You can also reduce electrical bills if you make sure your doors are weatherstripped properly. Our doors are warped, so even with proper “real” weatherstrip, they still leak air badly. I need to work on them this autumn. Last winter, on REALLY cold days, I used “gaff tape” to seal around the cracks. It was too cold to remove the doors and try to fix them properly. Gaff tape looks like duct tape, but doesn’t leave adhesive, and won’t pull the paint off the walls or doors. It is about $20 per roll, but I use it for my DJ business to tape down wires at events. I just stuck it to the doors, and at night, stuck it to the door frame to seal off the gaps. Since it didn’t peel the paint, when we left in the morning, we could just open the door.

What tips have you found to reduce electrical bills?

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