Category Archives: Side Hustle

Small Business Owner – It’s Always Something

It has been crazy busy the past several days. My office partner at the day job is out on vacation. Adding her responsibilities to mine, I barely have time to breathe. In addition to her workload, which is similar to mine, she also does additional reports. I am not familiar with them, so it takes me longer to complete.

Additionally, she is pregnant. While I’m happy she is having a baby, I’m NOT looking forward to carrying the additional workload during her eight to twelve week maternity leave. I will be surprised if anyone at the day job offers help.

My side hustle is a mobile DJ company. Having a small business is a challenge. It’s always something.

As is common for entertainers, it is “feast or famine”. Spring and Fall are the busy times of year for me. This October is the busiest so far. I have had my small business for three years. I currently have eighteen (18) events scheduled in October. This includes eleven (11) weddings.

Thankfully, I have another DJ who works with me. However, as those of you who have employees or contract laborers know, that brings it’s own set of challenges.

DJ B has been pretty dependable so far. However, he did get the flu earlier this year, and was unable to do a midweek corporate gig. DJ B called me that morning, while I was at my day job, “Brother, I can’t even get out of bed. I’m running a 103* fever, have sweats and chills, and am dizzy every time I stand up. I can’t do the gig today.

8-(

Panic time! That was about two hours before the gig was to start, and I’m at my day job for another seven hours. Happily, I had been performing as a DJ that week at my day job, for our annual employee appreciation event. I had to work overtime, doing my “real job”, plus performing four times over three days, for 1500 people over all three shifts. In lieu of overtime pay, I got comp time.

Guess what I did with my comp time. Yep, I left the day job, performed the retirement luncheon at the other company, packed up, drove back to the day job, set up, and performed again. 🙂

I booked a homecoming dance about two weeks ago for October 18th. I performed at Prom in April for this school and they LOVED it. I am also the paid announcer for their home football games. I offered to do Homecoming, but never heard back. Two weeks ago, the coordinating teacher calls and says, “We’d like you to do Homecoming“.

Great, but I’m already booked for a wedding, where the Ceremony is at 4 PM at one location, the Reception is about 45 minutes away at a second location, and DJ B is doing a wedding at a different location. However, I really don’t want to risk another DJ company coming in, doing Homecoming, and taking Prom by offering a crazy low price. I’m still the new guy in town, so I’m fighting to get market share from the local “big dog”.

The fun of being the small business newcomer.

So, I call DJ C, a guy I’ve worked with before, give him a verbal confirmation, and book the dance with the teacher. A few days ago, I text DJ C that I’m still waiting for paperwork (the teacher’s email is not working), but that the dance is still confirmed. DJ C says, “I didn’t hear back from you, so I’m booked elsewhere. I didn’t think it was for sure.

Geez… Why didn’t you call me before you booked the other gig? >:(

Over the weekend, I tried to reach DJ T by phone, email, and text. Nothing. I waited as long as I could.

Yesterday, I called DJ D. One of his guys is available, but the price is $200 more than DJ C, which seriously cuts into my profit. I’m providing the sound system. All DJ D has to do is roll in and perform, but I’m in a jam, so I gotta pay the price.

The fun of small business. 🙂

Mentors – Who Represents Your Business?

Mentors in small business can affect your bottom line!

Everyone has mentors. Some mentors teach you what to do. Other mentors teach you what NOT to do.

At 18, I got my first “real”, full-time job. The company serviced offshore oil rigs, and the drilling crews who lived and worked there.

Mentors are everywhere - photo of offshore oil rig

Mentors are everywhere, even in the oil field

When you are 100+ miles off the coast, working seven days a week, 12 hours per day, you don’t have time to “hit the drive-thru” for a burger after work, go grocery shopping, wash your laundry, or scrub your toilets. You’re too busy chasing black gold, pushing pipe, and swinging from the monkey board. You work hard, in all kinds of weather, at all hours of the day. It is good money, but you earn every dollar!

So, my employer provided kitchen and housekeeping services for drilling companies. We cooked, washed dishes, swept, mopped, changed and made beds, washed towels, sheets, and laundry, scrubbed toilets, and so forth. We were like the hotel staff for an oil field “resort”.

Yep, I was 18, and had hated washing dishes and cleaning my room in my parent’s home. Now, I was doing it as a full-time job. I’m sure my mother probably enjoyed the irony. 🙂

The training mentors were older and “wiser” in the ways of the world. Most had been through various jobs and marriages before ending up on a “resort” in the oil field. Like the roughnecks they served, they worked hard, lived dangerously, and partied like rock stars when they made it ashore.

Most of my training mentors didn’t pay much attention to me, the skinny, awkward “man”. They didn’t take an interest in me as a person, and they didn’t make a long-term impression on me. However, some twenty-five years later, I still remember one mentor.

The oil rig I was working on at the time was a few miles off the coast of Louisiana. In that part of the world, good Cajun food is a requirement, and rice is a mealtime staple. I don’t remember the name of this training mentor, so we’ll call him “Bob”. Bob was an older man, nearing retirement age, very crotchety.

As the “new kid”, I was working nights, so when I came to the galley to eat “breakfast” before starting work, it was approaching dinner time (for the day shift). As was the normal routine, there was Cajun food out for dinner, and I was going to eat that for my breakfast. I had previously noticed that Bob would cover the uneaten rice after the meals, and put it back out the next day.

No problem. Growing up as the oldest of four children, I was used to Mom doing that at home.

However, that day, when I went to add some rice to my Cajun “breakfast”, I noticed that there was mold growing on the cooked rice. Although money was tight growing up, and four hungry kids would have probably finished leftover rice long before mold would have started growing, I have no doubt Mom would have thrown moldy rice away.

Anyway, I grabbed the bowl and headed toward the trash can, pointing out the mold to Bob. He grabbed the bowl from my hands, growled at me to “shut the #@*% up”, and proceeded to rinse off the rice before placing it right back on the food line for the crew.

O_o

I have no idea why Bob did this. He wasn’t paying for the groceries himself. Our company was not stingy with the groceries. We had weekly steak night, weekly seafood night, and the kitchen was open 24/7. As far as I know, there were no “cost cutting profit-sharing” systems. The economy was good, and the oil business was especially good.

Twenty five years later, I still remember his actions.

Today, I have a small business. Contract employees work for me, and represent my company name. I want to be sure to mentor them the right way.

What did I learn from this “demented” mentor?

* Some people should not be trusted with your company name, much less as a mentor for your new staff.

As an impressionable new guy, this “mentor” was tasked with teaching me the corporate culture, and proper procedures. “Feed your client moldy rice” was probably not what the home office had in mind.

* Some people are penny wise, and dollar dumb.

Bob “saved” a few cents worth of rice.

Rice is cheap, oil is expensive.

Bad PR is even more expensive. If the crew had gotten food poisoning, it could have slowed or even stopped them from drilling. Just one shift  would have cost the drilling company thousands of dollars, or more.

My “mentor” would have lost his job. My employer probably would have lost their contract on that rig, and possibly the contracts for all the other rigs operated by that drilling company. Due to oil field gossip, my employer could have lost other contracts with other drilling companies in the region.

I wish “Undercover Boss” had been around back then. I found out later from co-workers that this was a regular occurrence, but that Bob had connections in high places within the company. They were apparently letting him coast to finish out his time until retirement.

What about you? Have you ever had a “demented mentor”? Have you ever worked for someone who taught you more lessons about what NOT to do, than they did about the right way to do things?

Five simple tips to trim the budget

Five Simple Ways to Reduce your Expenses and Trim the Budget

Trim the budget - photo of scissors cutting money

Trim the budget – five simple ways to reduce your expenses

At the end of every month, you should review your budget for the following month. I just did that last week. That way, you know how much money should come in, as well as when and where it will be coming from. Equally as important, this will show how much money is going out, as well as when and where it is going. Increasing your income is great, but most of us can find ways to trim the budget more readily than we can find ways to increase the income as much.

If you are spending more than you make, you can’t simply print more money and keep spending. Only the government can do that. Unlike our clueless clowns politicians, you have to choose… trim the budget, expand the income, or some combination of those two options. Increasing income is the best option.

However, generating additional income can be difficult for some people. A previous employer of mine forbid their employees from working a part-time job, small business, or any other “side hustles”.

Several years ago, I worked with a lady who’d had heart surgery. Her doctor wouldn’t release her to work full-time. She received a disability income from the government, if I remember correctly, and worked part-time for the company I worked for at the time. If she earned above a certain amount, which was less than it would take for her to be self-sufficient, she would lose the disability income, which was also not enough for her to live on. So, she was stuck in a dead-end, low-paying job several years, living with her kids and grandkids, until her full retirement / SSI kicked in. She was unable to earn enough to get off disability, and unable to earn enough staying on disability.

No matter your income level, chances are, there are steps you can take to reduce your recurring monthly expenses. This article will look at a few ways to trim the budget.

Thermostat – One of the easiest ways to trim the budget is to reduce your monthly electric bill. You can do this if you adjust your thermostat by a couple of degrees. We keep our thermostat at 78* during the summer, and 68* during the winter. In our previous home, which we owned, I replaced the old-fashioned thermostat with a programmable unit. It would adjust the temps to 82* during the summer, and 65* during the winter while we were gone to work, and then readjust them just before we normally got home. At night during the winter, after our normal bed time, it would let the temp drop to 60* while we were sleeping. We were under the blankets, so it was not a problem.

Dryer – When I was growing up in SE Texas, during the summer, we hung our laundry outside to dry. This is a very easy way to trim the budget. The dryer is a huge electricity hog, so doing this consistently can have a big impact on your monthly bill. During the winter, you can run the dryer for half the time, then let the clothes air dry on an indoor line. This can also add moisture to the indoor air, which is usually very dry during the winter.

TV – Do you really need all those channels? Do you really NEED any channels? Trim the budget by downsizing or eliminating your TV bill. Over the past decade, we saved hundreds of dollars merely by turning off our pay TV services. At least consider getting rabbit ears and see if you can pull in any local stations, if you “MUST” have TV.

Phone – Do you actually use your land line? As a step to trim the budget, we cancelled ours almost a decade ago. We realized most of our callers were either telemarketers, or politicians. Everyone else called our cell phone. Since you can take your cell phone number if you move to a different provider, consider dropping your land line. If you must keep your land line for DSL or the alarm system, drop all of the extra services, like call waiting and caller ID.

Internet – We have basic DSL, without a land line phone, from our local phone company. I would love to have cable internet speed, but realistically, I don’t need that speed all the time. I am a mobile DJ, and purchase my music online. It takes longer to download than I wish, but as a way to trim the budget, I have stayed with a slower speed service. Can you deal with a slower connection speed for monthly savings?

These five simple methods to trim the budget can potentially save you $50 to $100 or more per month. That is $600 to $1200 or more per year. How much more would you need to earn to have that much after taxes?

How about you? What are some simple tips you use to trim the budget? What has been your biggest saver so far?

 

Healthy Savings are not just a walk in the park

Healthy Savings – ideas to keep your budget, and your health, in top shape

“Healthy Savings” can describe a large discount. Healthy Savings can also be a play on words, to describe a situation where you save money, while partaking in healthy activities. This is the definition I will be writing about in this article.

Face it, what good is the lifestyle you work hard for, if you are so sick, tired, or out of shape that you can’t enjoy it? How many people do you know who worked hard, sacrificed, and saved their entire life for a great retirement, only to be unable to do the things they want to do? No one knows the future, and there are no guarantees, but usually people who take care of themselves live longer with better quality of life than those who do not.

Gym memberships are incredibly popular. They can also be incredibly expensive. Many people sign up with good intentions, but then, drop out. Unfortunately, due to how the contracts are designed, if you don’t use your membership, you don’t get a break on the price. Often, there is a minimum one year contract with monthly auto-drafts, whether you work out daily, or never darken the door. So, how can we take care of body and our budget at the same time?

Of course, you can simply put a treadmill, free weights, or machines at your house, and work out on your schedule. However, many people prefer being able to work out with others, and find the accountability of your exercise partner to be very beneficial.

Following are five ways you can have free or nearly free gym access.

Membership Benefit – Many large companies have a gym at the headquarters. They know that healthy employees are less likely to miss work due to illness. See if your company would consider installing a basic gym at your facility.

A free gym down the hallway from your office would be majorly Healthy Savings! If you work remotely, or are not close to the headquarters, do they have partnerships with any of the national gym chains, such as Gold’s Gym? I worked for a company which offered a 20-25% discount to the gym membership, plus no initiation fee. IIRC, since the bill was taken out automatically pre-tax, it also lowered the employee’s taxable income.

Attend college – When I was single, and living near Houston, the local community college had a small, but nice, gym. Racquetball, tennis, basketball, and a weight room. As a student, even if only taking one class per semester, you had gym access at no charge. That is Healthy Savings, Professor!

Side Hustle – Does your local gym need someone to work the front desk a few hours per month? Do you have fitness training where you could team up with a trainer to assist? Could you start your own part-time fitness or training business? Healthy Savings for free facility access, plus a side hustle income.

Personal Trainer – Some personal trainers will team up with a local gym for Healthy Savings. They will host their personal fitness training at the gym. Access to the gym is generally included with your training fees. Often, the gym will allow you to use the facilities outside of your “official” class time.

Free Pass – Many gyms will offer free day passes to try out the facilities. Often, “mom & pop” gyms are very generous. They don’t have the name recognition and fancy facilities that the national chains have, which can add up to Healthy Savings for you. You may find them to be much more willing to offer free passes, or special pricing to earn your business.

Also, many “mom & pop” gym operators are not really trying to run their gym as a business, but more as a serious hobby. Basically, the owners like to work out, and they like to socialize with others who like to work out; a gym gives them an easy way to do that. All the gear is a tax write-off, and they get to have a great workout facility and do something they love. If they make a little money too… score! 🙂 Since they are not in it for the money, they may be more generous with passes.

Keep in mind all of the exercise routines which do not require gym access. One of my favorites is from the US Army.

Healthy Savings - photo of soldier

Healthy Savings … the Army way.

I can attest to the quality of the training. It is full of distance running, sprinting, stretching, jumping, and body weight exercises, like sit-ups, push-up, and more. There are many other routines you can follow as well, such as Crossfit. Combined with proper nutrition, your budget and your waistline will slim down.

Healthy Savings can help you enjoy the lifestyle you work for.

What other ways have you come up with to experience Healthy Savings? What is the best value for gym membership you have discovered?